Press Releases

24 October 2017

Bank of Ireland Limerick and ICBA host trade briefing
 Michael Noonan, TD, Shannon airport and BDO among the speakers

Today Bank of Ireland Limerick hosted a special Ireland Canada Business Association (ICBA) Trade Briefing. The event, led by Bank of Ireland Corporate Banking’s Dan O’Donnell included a top speaker line-up including; Michael Noonan, TD, Andrew Murphy, Shannon Airport, Carol Lynch, BDO, Anne-Marie Tierney Le-Roux, IDA and Michael Broughton, Optel Group. The briefing was held in Bank of Ireland Limerick Workbench and saw over 50 business leaders and entrepreneurs in attendance.

 Speaking at the event, Dan O’Donnell, Bank of Ireland Corporate Banking and ICBA board member said; “We are delighted to host the ICBA here at Bank of Ireland Workbench Limerick and to hear from Irish and Canadian companies sharing their experiences and successes from both markets. Following the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) which came into provision last month, there’s been a lot of interest from our customers about how Irish companies can leverage CETA.

“It’s great to have such a packed audience including Limerick businesses and further afield, to hear the fantastic line-up of speakers including keynote speaker Michael Noonan, TD. For anyone interested it’s worth checking out Bank of Ireland’s Corporate Banking FDI portal https://corporate.bankofireland.com/sectors/fdi/ for more information.”

Kate Hickey Executive Director of the Ireland Canada Business Association said: “ICBA are pleased that Bank of Ireland Limerick are hosting today’s informative briefing. CETA is significant as ICBA members will see 99% of their bilateral trade liberalised and it will give Irish and Canadian companies a real competitive advantage. CETA will mean that it’s easier for Irish staff to work in Canada in the short-term. SME’s will no longer have to double test their products with the mutual conformity that CETA has brought since its provisional application on 21st September.”

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